Assisting self-explanation prompts are more effective than open prompts when learning with multiple representations (Berthold, Eysink, & Renkl)

Berthold, K., Eysink, T. H. S., & Renkl, A. (2008). Assisting self-explanation prompts are more effective than open prompts when learning with multiple representations. Instructional Science, 37(4), 345-363.  The authors compared the effects of two types of self-explanation prompts as help procedures for integrating and understanding multiple representational worked-out examples. Probability theory was chosen as … Continue reading

Groupware Goes to School (Stahl)

Stahl, G. (2002). Groupware goes to school. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, 7–24. The author describes a computer-supported collaborative learning application called Synergeia), a groupware software program that was extended to support collaborative learning in a classroom environment. In addition, Synergeia facilitates knowledge building, perspective intertwining, knowledge negotiation, portfolio sharing and knowledge artifacts.

Person-plus: a distributed view of thinking and learning (Perkins)

Perkins, D.N. (1993). Person-plus: A distributed view of thinking and learning. In G. Salomon (Ed.), Distributed Cognitions: Psychological and educational considerations (pp.88-110). Perkins introduces something he refers to as the “equivalent access hypothesis” — because thinking and learning involves not only the person but also her surround, the ability to think and learn ably depends … Continue reading

Psychology of Learning for Instruction: Chapter 11 — Contructivism

*From Driscoll, M.P. (2005).  Psychology of Learning  for Instruction. (3rd ed.). Boston: Pearson  Education, Inc. There is no single constructivist theory of instruction. Driscoll points out other labels and theories that employ/embody constructivist principles. These include: constructionist, generative learning, embodied cognition, cognitive flexibility theory, postmodern and poststructural curricula, and situated cognition.